NEW BLUE DOLPHIN AGE GROUP RECORD HOLDERS

CONGRATS ON YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS

ALYSSA KELLY 15 200 M FLY
347.74 9-10 YR OLD
HALEY THIER 15″ 50 M FLY
31.58 13-14
PEYTON MCNULTY 15 100 M BACK
109.49 13-14
PEYTON MCNULTY 15 200 M BACK
231.77 13-14
NICO LASTAUSKAS 15 400 M FREE
426.00 15-18
NICO LASTAUSKAS 15 1500 M FREE
1739.42 15-18
NICO LASTAUSKAS 15 400 M IM
500.00 15-18
400 M MEDLEY PEYTON MCNULTY, AUDREY CAMPO, CAT DONLON, BAILEY BABARSKY
RELAY 15-18 445.25

Practice Schedule This Week

Hi Everyone! This week we will have practice Monday through Friday evenings. We will do time trials Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 6-7:45 pm, and Thursday and Friday will be 6-7:30. Weekend practices will be TBA.

Make sure everyone’s ready to get in the water before 6 pm Monday through Wednesday.

See you there!

Missing BDA notes

One note missing from Saturday Finals Time Trials was Haley Thier’s time in her time trial….her speedy 31.58 was missed in the results. This was 4th on the all time top 10 list and the new BDA 13-14 50 fly record.

Also thanks to coach Colin Manley for helping out with our Silver and Gold practices during seniors and sharing his great knowledge and experience with swimming with our swimmers.

Tips to the Top

The meters have been swum…

The technique has been honed and perfected…

But no matter how well a swimmer trained in practice, inevitably swimmers want to know how to make the most of their training.

How to know that once they get up on the blocks, that both mind and muscles will work together in harmony to produce a result that is deserving of the hard work put in over the months and years in the pool.

Here are 3 powerful ways to make sure that you are not only physically prepared to swim fast at the big meet, but mentally ready as well:

Be ready for conditions that are difficult or adverse.

This is a hard one, and something most swimmers struggle to accept as a necessary part of training.

Look:

Conditions are rarely perfect or even close when it comes down to the big meet.

The weather is chilly. You’re late to the pool. You jam up your fingers on a fellow swimmer pushing off the wall during a jam-packed warm-up.

Things will happen.

How do we prepare for these moments? How do we develop the short term memory and the confidence necessary to be able to not only survive in conditions that aren’t ideal, but to be able to thrive in difficult circumstances?

In a word: practice.

If you are only willing to give a great effort at practice when everything is going 100% your way, than you will expect and require the same level of perfect circumstances in competition to perform your best.

But if you can still set an in-practice best time at the end of a long week of training when you are bagged, or if you can hammer out the main set on a bad night of sleep, or with an extra draggy drag suit, or in a pool that has 9 other swimmers in your lane, than you begin to develop the type of resiliency and mental toughness that becomes so important when you step up on the blocks.

Don’t shy away from the challenging stuff in practice.

Be the swimmer that is not only willing to take on the hard sets, but be the swimmer that will do it when circumstances aren’t perfect, ideal, or even close to either.

Focus on the present.

Swim meets can be an overwhelming experience for the swimmer that gets lost in what is happening around them.

There’s the fast swimming of others that makes us doubt whether we did enough in training to fulfill our own objectives. There’s the sudden fishbowl effect of standing up on the blocks, having all your teammates, friends and family staring at you. And the sometimes paralyzing realization that the race you are about to swim is a short and one-time reflection of all the time, energy and hard work that you have put in over the past few months.

The simplest way to block out everything that is going around you—and some of the stuff that is going on in your own head—is to focus on the present.

After all, if you are getting lost in what the competition is doing, in the conditions of the meet, or on the high expectations of yourself for your performance, than you lose the relaxation and “mindfulness” that comes with focusing on the present.

Being ready to race means being relaxed (mentally, if not physically).

Think back to the last time you destroyed your best time in a 100-200 event.

How would you describe the way you felt in the water? Relaxed? Like you almost could have gone faster?

When you are relaxed, with slow and deep breaths, relaxed muscles, and a low heart rate you not only help ward off excess anxiety, you give your body a chance to perform in competition what you have been working on in practice.

Focus on execution.

Swimming fast is great. Awesome. Super great-awesome, in fact.

There are fewer better and more satisfying feelings than looking up at the scoreboard and seeing a brand new best time and a number one beside our name (place, not lane).

We fixate so much on that desired result, of the outcome of the event that we don’t give enough attention to the things we should be doing right now in order to get prepared.

A straightforward way that I would keep my cool and focus on execution while racing was using a set of very simple cues.

There was one that my coach always emphasized, and that I remember most to this day. It was: “easy speed.”

Knowing that at times I could get a little, well, worked up behind the blocks and potentially go out with a little too much frantic speed on the front end of a race with little in reserve for a strong finish, before big races he would lay out a set of cues for each portion of the race.

The following cues are for a long course 100m race—

  • For the start and breakout: “Explode to the surface!”
  • For the first 25-50m: “Easy speed!”
  • Into the turn: “Surf into the wall!”
  • For the 50-75m: “Attack!”
  • The last 25m: “Finish with everything you have!”

These cues were simple, and that was exactly the point.It kept me from overthinking things, and to focus on doing one thing at a time.

In a race you shouldn’t have to be thinking about technique—that was the point of those thousands and thousands of meters and yards in practice.

You shouldn’t get lost in what other swimmers are doing, and even though yes, it is a race, if you focus your entire race plan based on reacting to what other swimmers are doing it won’t work well for an overwhelming majority of swimmers.

Be willing to train in adverse conditions…

Focus on the moment…

Focus on execution.

?l=LAULQ&m=3tIR0jERdcdKqrd

See you at the Top!

Saturday Seniors Swims!

Saturday Prelims:
Peyton McNulty swam an evenly paced 200 back, just missing the 3rd 50 from her goal pace, a little off her best.
I’ve always found that anything worth achieving will always have obstacles in the way and you’ve got to have that drive and determination to overcome those obstacles on route to whatever it is that you want to accomplish.
Chuck Norris

50 frees: Bailey Babarsky lit up the waters with a sparkling almost 1 second drop in her 50 free (29.26). Haley Their just missed cracking 30 and her best time in her sprint to the finish. Audrey Campo bolted her way to the wall to improve her time, and bump herself up to 4th on the all-time top 10 list (28.52). Cat Donlon was also slightly off her best 50. Audrey’s 50 was voted SWIM OF THE SESSION, and with this swim she was named SWIMMER OF THE SESSION!
Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is strong enough.
Og Mandino

200 IMs: Peyton McNulty, Katie Voitik, and Cat Donlon tackled the 200 IMs, all coming just a little short of their bests.
Thank you to Greg Babarsky and Gene McNulty for being BDA’s safety volunteers for today’s session!
Saturday BDA Time Trials at Finals:
Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.
John F. Kennedy

BDA swimmers got up on the blocks after warmup to go after some top 50 times. Bailey Babarsky shining as a leader throughout the weekend took the lead getting up first and racing to an over 2 second drop in her best 50 fly (32.79). Bailey showed her leadership throughout the meet, in preparing for swims, helping teammates prepare for their swims and always being there to support her teammates, as well as learning and trying new things in her swims. She put herself in the 10th place spot on the all-time top 10 charts for butterfly in her time trial. Peyton McNulty chose a freestyle showing, finishing just off her best 50. Cat Donlon then took on her 50 fly where she slightly out touched her best 50 (31.97). She bumped herself to 5th on the all-time top 10. Audrey Campo then hopped up to strut her fly stuff, improving her fly and IM aspirations with a 2.5 second drop from the previous days IM split (31.17). Audrey finished off her fly with a 3rd place showing on the top 10 charts. Haley Their finished off the BDA time trials with an outstandingly awesome 3 second drop and super swim taking down teammate Cat Donlon’s 13-14 BDA record, and putting her own stamp on the top 10 charts with a 4th spot showing. Haley’s fly was SWIM OF THE SESSION for the time trials, and she was named SWIMMER OF THIS SESSION with this record breaking swim.
Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren’t used to an environment where excellence is expected.
Steve Jobs

BDA Finals: Katie Voitik took on her last pounding laps swim of the meet with a nice and evenly paced race, going out close to her 400, and faster than her 800 this meet, just 2 seconds off her best 800 from last year. She finished slightly off her best, but put in a strong effort and held onto a pace throughout (1832.36). Katie was named SWIMMER OF THE SESSION with the mile being her SWIM OF THE SESSION in her final Bucknell hoorah! Thanks to Katie’s mom, Denise for providing the team with dinner after Friday night’s session!
When your values are clear to you, making decisions becomes easier.
Roy E. Disney

Swimmer of the meet goes to Audrey Campo. Audrey turned her meet around from a little bit of stumbling the first day into some rising and shining swims as the week went on. She made the most of her relay opportunities, pulling off outstanding swims on relays, and also was able to learn and grow throughout the weekend in each of her individual events. Audrey showed support for her support for her teammates and worked with the coaches to learn from each of her swims. Congrats Audrey!
Thank you again to the parents who helped out during the sessions as our safety volunteers, representing BDA in a good way! Also thank you again to Denise Voitik and Kristine McNulty for providing meals and helping the swimmers to have the best meet possible!

Friday Seniors

Friday prelims:
Cat Donlon started off her day with her season best 100 breaststroke (124.66). Bailey Babarsky just missed her best by a hair.

Pearls don’t lie on the seashore. If you want one, you must dive for it.— Chinese Proverb

In the 400 free relay, BDA showed that Together Everyone Achieves More, going 4 for 4 with best times and earning 2nd place overall on the BDA top 10, nearly eclipsing the BDA record. Cat “red meat” Donlon took the lead off leg with a new best (102.03), bumping herself up to 2nd all time. Audrey “I like it all” Campo hopped up next with another outstanding swim and 4th on the top 10 (101.88 split). Then came Bailey “Thai is my style” Babarsky who revved her engines for a 5th place on the top charts (102.35 split). Peyton “Bacon n cereal ” McNulty turned it over to anchor the relay with a new best, topping her time trials time from the day before (104.11 split). BDA won their heat and the prelim session of the event with a 410.37, going 4 for 4 with bests and earning the SWIM OF THE SESSION.

If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.— Michael Jordan

400 IM: Katie ” cucumbers and crutons” Voitik took on her 400 IM with a strong finishing freestyle finishing close to her best (525.84). Cat Donlon tackled a 9 second drop in her IM swimming a solid race for herself and earning herself a long course senior cut in the swim as well (534.76).

A flower does not think of competing with the flower next to it. It just blooms.— Unknown
Time trials:

Audrey Campo lit up her first 50 fly with a best and 10th on the top 10 charts (33.29). She finished off her 200 IM with a 6 second drop and 9th place ranking on the top 10 charts (237.32), also putting herself within 1 second of the senior cut. Bailey Babarsky topped off her best 100 breast (122.46) and finished with a 255.72 new best, zone cut and 8th place on the top 10 charts in her stylin 200 breast. Haley “peanut butter” Thier ended the SESSION on a high with a drop on her best 100 free (107.21).

Thank you to Denise Voitik and Maureen Donlon for being BDAs safety representative throughout the long session! And Thanks to Kristine McNulty for providing another yummy meal for the team!

More Relay highlights from Bucknell

More notes on some great stuff happening on relays!

Congratulations to Bailey Babarsky and Peyton McNulty for putting themselves 9th and 10th on the all time top 10 for their 200 free in Wednesdays relay. This relay team also finished 16th place in Seniors.

The 400 medley team from Thursdays time of 445.25 ended up finishing 12th place overall in Seniors with a strong showing for BDA. One note on this relay, it was also 4.10 seconds ahead of BDAs previous record. Way to go!

Seniors Day 2!

Thursday prelims:

Special thank you to Kristine McNulty for ordering and providing a yummy meal for Wednesday nights dinner!!!

“Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we react to it.”– Dennis P. Kimbro

Audrey Campo started out her day with a smiling best 100 free (103.73), bumping herself ahead of teammate Bailey Babarsky to 9th place on the all time top 10 charts. Cat Donlon snuck past her old best 100 free, holding strong at her 3rd place on the top 10 charts.

“Nurture your mind with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes.”– Benjamin Disraeli

In the 400 medley relay, Audrey Campo led the way with a double best 100 breast putting herself 2nd on the top 10 charts for her 50 (36.46 split), and 5th place in her 100 (119.70 split). Audrey, along with teammates Peyton McNulty (110.84 back), Cat Donlon (110.95 fly split), and Bailey Babarsky (103.76 free split) put themselves on top of the BDA records, surpassing the previous record by Mia Nonnenberg, Katie Voitik, Cat Donlon, and Angela Stahl. Audrey’s breaststroke leg was named SWIM OF THE SESSION!

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”– Lao Tzu

Time Trials: Bailey Babarsky time trialed her 400 free, experimenting with taking out her race more relaxed. Bailey just missed her best, but tried something different and learned from her race. Audrey Campo tackled her 200 back, cruising smoothly through the water, beating her best time and finishing strong (237.73). Haley Thier raced a strong first 50, going after her best but falling just 0.06 short (119.39). Peyton McNulty finished off the long day at the pool with a new best 100 free (105.82).

Audrey Campo stepped up today going 4 best times in 3 swims, and leading her team to a BDA relay record. She earned SWIMMER OF THE SESSION!

“The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible.”– Arthur C. Clarke